Philippines moves up to 8th in gender gap ranking


The WEF index showed the Philippines, which placed eighth this year from 10th in 2017, was the second highest ranked country in the East Asia and the Pacific.Miguel de Guzman

The Philippines climbed two places to reach the eighth spot out of 149 countries in this year’s Global Gender Gap Report of the World Economic Forum.

The WEF index showed the Philippines, which placed eighth this year from 10th in 2017, was the second highest ranked country in the East Asia and the Pacific.

Within the East Asia and the Pacific region, New Zealand (sixth) was ahead of the Philippines.

Meanwhile, the following countries in East Asia and the Pacific region were behind the Philippines: Lao People’s Democratic Republic (26th), Australia (39th), Mongolia (58th), Singapore (67th), Thailand (73rd), Vietnam (77th), Indonesia (85th) and Myanmar (88th).

In terms of the overall index, Iceland remained the world’s most gender-equal country as it topped the list.

This was followed by Norway in second place and Sweden in third, while Finland and Nicaragua ranked fourth and fifth, respectively.

Yemen was at the bottom of the list at 149th spot.

The WEF’s Global Gender Gap report seeks to measure the relative gaps between women and men across four key areas: health, education, economy and politics.

In the health and survival pillar, the Philippines saw its ranking drop to 42nd place from 36th last year.

Meanwhile, the Philippines’ ranking improved to 14th place in the economic participation and opportunity pillar this year from the previous year’s 25th place.

“It manages to narrow its economic participation and opportunity gender gap due to increases in wage equality for similar work and women’s estimated earned income,” the WEF said.

As for the educational attainment pillar, the Philippines maintained its top position.

It likewise held on to the 13th spot in the political empowerment pillar.

Apart from looking at the gaps in the four key areas, the index also seeks to identify potential role models by showing which countries are leading in terms of distributing resources equitably between women and men.—Source: Louella Desiderio (The Philippine Star)

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